Foam Kernow crypto ‘tea party’

Last night we ran an experimental cryptoparty at Foam Kernow. We’d not tried something like this before, or have any particular expertise with cryptography – so this was run as a research gathering for interested people to find out more about it.

One of the misconceptions about cryptography I wanted to start with is that it’s just about hiding things. We looked at Applied Cryptography by Bruce Schneier where he starts with explaining the 3 things that cryptography provide beyond confidentiality:

Authentication. It should be possible for the receiver of a message to ascertain it’s origin; an intruder should not be able to masquerade as someone else.
Integrity. It should be possible for the receiver of a message to verify that it has not been modified in transit; an intruder should not be able to substitute a false message for a legitimate one.
Nonrepudiation. A sender should not be able to falsely deny later that they sent the message.

It’s interesting how confidentiality is tied up with these concepts – you can’t compromise one without damaging the others. Also how these are a requirement for human communication, but we’ve become so used to living without them.

One of the most interesting things was to hear the motivations for people to come along and find out more about this subject. There were general feeling of loss of control over online identity and data. Some of the more specific aspects:

  • Ambient data collection, our identity increasingly becoming a commodity – being modeled for purposes we do not have control over.
  • Centralisation of communication being a problem – e.g. gmail.
  • Never knowing when your privacy might become important eg. you find yourself in an abusive relationship, suddenly it matters.
  • Knowing that privacy is something we should be thinking about but not wanting to. Similar to knowing we shouldn’t be using the car but doing it anyway.
  • Awareness that our actions don’t just affect us, but our families, friends and colleagues privacy – needing to think about them too.
  • Worrying when googling about health, financial or legal subjects.
  • Being aware that email is monitored in the workplace.

We talked about the encryption we already use – gpg for email with thunderbird and Tor for browsing anonymously. One of the tricky areas we talked about was setting this kind of thing up for mobile – do you need specific apps, an entire OS or specific hardware? This is something we need to spend a bit more time looking into.

Personally speaking, on my phone I use a free firewall so I can at least control which apps on my phone can be online – and I only became aware of this from developing for android and seeing the amount of ‘calling home’ that completely arbitrary applications do regularly.

We also discussed asymmetric key pair crytography – how the mathematics meshes so neatly with social conventions, so you can sign a message to prove you wrote it, or sign someone else’s public key to build up a ‘web of trust’.

We didn’t get very practical, this was more about discussing the issues and feelings on the topic. That might be something to think about for future cryptoparties.

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