Slub at the Deershed festival

Deershed is a music festival designed to accommodate families with lots of activities for children. Part of this year’s festival was a Machines Tent, including Lego robot building, Mechano constructions, 3D printing and computer games.

Slub’s daily routine in the Machines Tent started by setting up the Al Jazari gamepad livecoding installation, a couple of hours with Martyn Eggleton teaching Scratch programming on an amazing quad Raspberry Pi machine (screens/processors and keyboards all built into a welded cube).

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At some point we would switch to Minecraft, trying some experiments livecoding the LAN game world using Martyn’s system to access the Minecraft API using Waterbear, a visual programming language using a similar blocks approach as Scratch and Scheme Bricks.

During the afternoons Alex and I could try some music livecoding experiments. This was a great environment for playful audience participatory performances, with families continually passing through the tent I could use a dancemat to trigger synths in fluxus while Alex livecoded music designed to encourage people to jump up and down.

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One of the most interesting things for me was to be able to see how lots of children (who mostly didn’t know each other) collaborate and self organise themselves in a LAN game, there was quite a pattern to it with all the groups:

  1. Mess around with Minecraft as usual (make some blocks, start building a house).
  2. Find something built by someone else, destroy a few bricks.
  3. Snap out of the game to notice that the other kids are complaining.
  4. Realise that there are other people in the world – and they are sat around them!
  5. Attempt to fix the damage.

At this point other people would join in to help fix things, after which there would be some kind of understanding reached between them to respect each other’s creations. This has all really inspired me to work on Al Jazari 2 which combines a lot of these ideas.

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Deershed Festival, Sonic Bike Lab, Fascinate Festival

Preparations for a busy summer, new Al Jazari installation gamepads on the production line:

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This weekend Alex and I are off to the Deershed Festival in Yorkshire to bring slub technology to the younger generation. We’ll be livecoding algorave, teaching scratch programming on Raspberry Pis and running an Al Jazari installation in between. Then onwards to London for a Sonic Bike Lab with Kaffe Matthews where we’re going to investigate the future of sonic bike technology and theory – including possibly, bike sensor driven synthesis and on the road post-apocalyptic mesh networking.

At the end of August I’m participating in my local media arts festival – Fascinate in Falmouth, where I’ll be dispensing a dose of algorave and probably even more musical robot techno.

MS Stubnitz Algorave #2

Our second offshore Algorave on the MS Stubnitz, during the ship’s final night in London. The crowd was pleasingly diverse with lots of people new to algorave and livecoding, and although behind the scenes we had some hitches due to the ship’s impending departure for France, the event was relaxed and went smoothly. Our performance was honoured by guest appearance from Elvi$ Ca$h as well as a re-compile of the Al Jazari rave bots. As one of those spending the night on the ship afterwards, I had to be careful not to have too much of a lie in!

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Alexandra Cárdenas live coded dark textures and sharply angled beats.
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Shelly and some Mandelbrots, transmitting multi-layered synthetic tones with Davide Della Casa in the foreground operating livecodelab who, with Guy John live coded inspiring minimalist geometric expressions to match the music throughout the night.

Better, and considerably wider angle photos can be found here by Yoshizen.

Algorave practice

It’s been a huge amount of time since I recorded anything, but I thought I would a) try and do some actual livecoding practice for the upcoming algorave on Thursday and b) record everything. As usual I’m following my foolhardy approach of improvising both musical structure and sound material by livecoding synth graphs from scratch. Sometimes it takes while longer than I would like to reach a suitable musical complexity (this is faster in a real live situation, with increased adrenaline), and some fiddly things there never seems time to sort out, such as stereo! For these recordings, and live on stage with slub I use the scheme bricks visual programming language. Here are some of my favourites, the complete set is here.

Life on an Algorave Tour

Some pictures taken during the recent Algorave Tour, making people dance to algorithms in Brighton, London, Karlesruhe, Cologne and Dusseldorf.

The MS Stubnitz moored in Canary Wharf surrounded by financial architecture:
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Wandering around during soundcheck, a heavy duty workshop on the Stubnitz:
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Sound checking with Andrew Sorenson:
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A speaker close up, one of many:
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Norah Lorway shaking the boat’s superstructure with sub bass:
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MYK livecoded acid squelch:
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Sick Lincoln deploying highly danceable crowd pleasing algorithms:
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Mico Rex, Mexico’s finest algorave pop duo closing the night:
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Onward to Karleruhe, a random photo of the slub soundcheck:
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Hernani Villaseñor 8bit house with visible parentheses:
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Fredrik Olofsson livecoding 5 arduino’s simultaneously for 2 bit grindcore:
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algoravin in the UK

A short trip around the UK for slub over the last couple of days, a livecoding gig in London at Bartlett Nexus in UCL at an event concerning architecture, games and hand made technology. A full video of the event (with us at the end) is here.

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Also collected along the way, a photo of the xname manufacturing lab:
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Then up to Birmingham to attend the Network Music Festival and do another performance late on Saturday night. While there we had a chance to meet the members of The Hub, pioneers of networked music and livecoding. It was inspiring to chat with such experienced musicians in this field. The NMF included a huge range of performances, for example Melatab who used Kinect cameras for networked performance in a shared virtual space. I’m planning some Kinect hacking soon, so I took some photos:

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slub at /* vivo */

My last /* vivo */ Mexico post, some data from our livecoding performance on the final day. This was one of those performances where we had a rough plan and got a bit too carried away by the crowd to follow it (I guess one of the great things about improvisation!). Also to a great deal the music was influenced by mezcal, the fermented spirit from the maguey plant, which I can report is the secret ingredient of Mexican livecoding. My edit history and a screen shot of the final state of the program is online here. The new temporal recursion system was actually pretty damn challenging (hence the serious face) but in combination with Alex’s pattern generation seemed to get people moving pretty well…

Mexican livecoding style

At only around 2 years old, the Mexican livecoding scene is pretty advanced. Here are images of (I think) all of the performances at /*vivo*/ (Simposio Internacional de Música y Código 2012) in Mexico City, which included lots of processing, fluxus, pure data and ATMEL processor bithop along with supercollider and plenty of non-digital techniques too. The from-scratch technique is considered important in Mexico, with most performances using this creative restriction to great effect. My comments below are firmly biased in favour of fluxus, not considering myself knowledgeable enough for thorough examinations of supercollider usage. Also there are probably mistakes and misappropriations – let me know!

Hernani Villaseñor, Julio Zaldívar (M0M0) – A performance of contrasts between Julio’s C coded 8bit-shifting ATMEL sounds and Hernani’s from scratch supercollider scripts, both building up in intensity through the performance, a great opener. A side effect of Julio using avrdude to upload code resulted in the periodic sonification of bytecode as it spilled into the digital to analogue converter during uploads. He was also using an oscilloscope to visualise the sound output, some of the code clearly designed for their visuals as well as crunchy sounds.

Mitzi Olvera and Alejandro Franco – I’d been aware of Mitzi’s work for a while from her fluxus videos online so it was great to see this performance, she made good use of the fluxus immediate mode primitives, and started off with restricting them to points mode only, while building up a complex set of recursive patterns and switching render hints to break the performance down into distinct sections. She neatly transitioned from the initial hard lines and shapes all the way to softened transparent clouds. Meanwhile Alejandro built up the mix and blasted us with Karplus Strong synthesis, eventually forcing scserver to it’s knees by flooding it with silent events.

Julian Rohrhuber, Alberto de Campo – A good chunk of powerbooks unplugged (plugged in) from Julian and Alberto, starting with a short improvisation before switching to a full composition explored within the republic framework, sharing code and blending their identities.

Martín Zumaya (Stereo Vision), José Carlos Hasbun (joseCaos) – It was good to see Processing in use for livecoding, and Martin improvised a broad range of material until concentrating on iconic minimal constructions that matched well with José’s sounds – a steady build up of dark poly-rhythmic beats with some crazy feedback filtering mapped to the mouse coordinates to keep things fluid and unpredictable.

IOhannes Zm̦lnig Рpure data morse code livecoded in Braille. This was an experiment based on his talk earlier that day, a study in making the code as hard to read for the performer as the audience. In fact the resulting effect was beautiful, ending with the self modification of position and structure that IOhannes is famous for Рleaving a very consistent audio/visual link to the driving monotonic morse bass, bleeps and white noise.

Radiad3or (Jaime Lobato, Alberto Cerro, Fernando Lomelí, Iván Esquinca y Mauro Herrera) – part 1 was human instruction, analogue performance as well as a comment at the inadequacy of livecoding for a computer, with commands like “changeTimbre” for the performers to interpret using their voices, a drumkit, flutes and a didgeridoo. Following this, part 2 was about driving the computer with these sounds, inverting it into a position alongside or following the performers rather than a mediator, being reprogrammed by the music. This performance pushed the concept of livecoding to new levels, leaving us in the dust still coming to terms with what we were trying to do in the first place!

Benoît and the Mandelbrots (live from Karlsruhe) – a remote performance from Germany, the Mandelbrots dispatched layers upon layers of synthesised texture, along with their trademark in-performance text chat, a kind of code unto itself and a view into their collective mind. The time lag issues involved with remote streaming, not knowing what/when they could see of us, added an element to this performance all of it’s own. As did the surprise appearance of various troublemakers into the live video stream…

Jorge Ramírez – another remote performance, this time from Beijing, China. Part grimy glitch and part sonification of firewalls and effects of imagined or real monitoring and censorship algorithms this was powerful, and included more temporal disparity – this time caused by the sound arriving some time before the code that described it.

Si, si, si (Ernesto Romero Mariscal Guasp y Luciana Renner Maceralli) – a narrative combination of Luciana’s performance art, tiny webcam augmented theatre sets, and Ernesto’s supercollider soundtrack. Livecoding hasn’t ventured into storytelling much yet, and this performance indicated that it should. Luciana’s inventive use of projection with liquids and transparent fibres reminded me of the early days of film effects and was a counterpoint to Ernesto’s synthesised ambience and storytelling audio.

Luis Navarro, Emilio Ocelotl – ambitious stuff this – dark dubsteppy sounds from Emilio, driving parameters of a from-scratch fluxus sierpinski fractal exploration from Luis. Similar to Mitzi’s performance, Luis limited his scene to immediate mode primitives, a ternary tree recursion forming the basis for constantly morphing structures.

Alexandra Cárdenas, Eduardo Obieta – Something very exciting I noticed was a tendency when working in sound/visual pairs such as Alexandra and Eduardo for the sounds to be designed with the visuals in mind – e.g. the use of contrasting frequencies that could be picked out well by fft algorithms. This demonstrated a good mutual understanding, as well as a challenge to the normal DJ/VJ hierarchy. Eduardo fully exercised the NURBS primitive (I remember it would hardly render at 10fps when I first added it to fluxus!) exploding it to the sound input before unleashing the self-test script to end the performance in style!

Eduardo Mel̩ndez Рone of the original Mexican livecoders, programming audio and visuals at the same time! Not only that Рbut text (supercollider) and visual programming (vvvvv) in one performance too. I would have liked to have paid closer attention to this one, but I was a bit nervous

Slub finished off the performances, but I’ll write more about that soon as material comes in (I didn’t have time to take any photos!).

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A new version of scheme bricks is under way, planned to be tested out with slub on the Mozilla Fest Party, then taken across the Atlantic for some more livecoding action in Mexico City! New things include blocks with depth – cosmetic for the moment, but I plan to prototype some new ideas based on this, separately zoom-able code blocks, and most importantly it’s a complete rewrite into functional R5RS Scheme for portability – it should now be relatively simple to get it on android via Nomadic which uses Tinyscheme.

Using the new temporal recursion, the code produced is much less monolithic. Massively tall structures resulting from plugging together sequences during long performances were a bit of an issue before, but splitting the code into a multitude of functions (which can be shrunk and put in the “background”) seems to be a far easier way of working so far.