Crab camouflage citizen science game

The Natural History Museum London commissioned us to build a crab catching camouflage game with the Sensory Ecology Group at the University of Exeter (who we’ve worked with previously on the Nightjar games and Egglab). This citizen science game is running on a touchscreen as part of the Colour and Vision exhibition which is running through the summer. Read more about it here.

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Red King progress, and a sonification voting system

We have now launched the Red King simulation website. The fundamental idea of the project is to use music and online participation to help understand a complex natural process. Dealing with a mathematical model is more challenging than a lot of our citizen science work, where the connection to organisms and their environments is more clear. The basic problem here is how to explore a vast parameter space in order to find patterns in co-evolution.

After some initial experiments we developed a simple prototype native application (OSX/Ubuntu builds) in order to check we understand the model properly by running and tweaking it.

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The next step was to convert this into a library we could bind to python. With this done we can run the model on a server, and have it autonomously update it’s own website via django. This way we can continuously run the simulation, storing randomly chosen parameters to build a database and display the results. I also set up a simple filter to run the simulation for 100 timesteps and discard parameters that didn’t look so interesting (the ones that went extinct or didn’t result in multiple host or virus strains).

There is also now a twitter bot that posts new simulation/sonifications as they appear. One nice thing I’ve found with this is that I can use the bot timeline to make notes on changes by tweeting them. It also allows interested people an easy way to approach the project, and people are already starting discussions with the researchers on twitter.

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Up to now, this has simply been a presentation of a simulation – how can we involve people so they can help? This is a small project so we have to be realistic what is possible, but eventually we need a simple way to test how the perception of a sonification compares with a visual display. Amber’s been doing research into the sonification side of the project here. More on that soon.

For now I’ve added a voting system, where anyone can up or down-vote the simulation music. This is used as a way to tag patterns for further exploration. Parameter sets are ranked using the votes – so the higher the votes are the higher the likelihood of being picked as the basis for new simulations. When we pick one, we randomise one of its parameters to generate new audio. Simulations store their parents, so you can explore the hierarchy and see what changes cause different patterns. An obvious addition to this is to hook up the twitter retweets and favorites for the same purpose.

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Red King – listening to coevolution

Scientific models are used by researchers in order to understand interactions that are going on around us all the time. They are like microscopes – but rather than observing objects and structures, they focus on specific processes. Models are built from the ground up from mathematical rules that we infer from studying ecosystems, and they allow us to run and re-run experiments to gain understanding, in a way which is not possible using other methods.

I’ve managed to reproduce many of the patterns of co-evolution between the hosts and parasites in the red king model by tweaking the parameters, but the points at which certain patterns emerge is very difficult to pin down. I thought a good way to start building an understanding of this would be to pick random parameter settings (within viable limits) and ‘sweep’ paths between them – looking for any sudden points of change, for example:

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This is a row of simulations which are each run for 600 timesteps, with time running downwards. The parasite is red and the host is blue, and both organism types are overlayed so you can see them reacting to each other through time. Each run has a slightly different parameter setting, gradually changing between two settings as endpoints. Halfway through there is a sudden state change – from being unstable it suddenly locks into a stable situation on the right hand side.

I’ve actually mainly been exploring this through sound so far – I’ve built a setup where the trait values are fed into additive synthesis (adding sine waves together). It seems appropriate to keep the audio technique as direct as possible at this stage so any underlying signals are not lost. Here is another parameter sweep image (100 simulations) and the sonified version, which comprises 2500 simulations, overlapped to increase sound density.

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You can hear quite a few shifts and discontinuities between different branching patterns that emerge at different points – writing this I realise an animated version might be a good idea to try too.

Stereo is done by slightly changing one parameter (the host tradeoff curve) across the left and right channels – so it gives the changes a sense of direction, and you are actually hearing 5000 simulations being run in total, in both ears. All the code so far (very experimental at present) is here. The next thing to do is to take a step back and think about the best way to invite people in to experience this strange world.

Here are some more tests:

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Red King: Host/Parasite co-evolution citizen science

A new project begins, on the subject of ecology and evolution of infectious disease. This one is a little different from a lot of Foam Kernow’s citizen science projects in that the subject is theoretical research – and involves mathematical simulations of populations of co-evolving organisms, rather than the direct study of real ones in field sites etc.

The simulation, or model, we are working with is concerned with the co-evolution of parasites and their hosts. Just as in more commonly known simulations of predators and prey, there are complex relationships between hosts and parasites – for example if parasites become too successful and aggressive the hosts start to die out, in turn reducing the parasite populations. Hosts can evolve to resist infection, but this has an overhead that starts to become a disadvantage when most of a population is free of parasites again.

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Example evolution processes with different host/parasite trade-offs.

Over time these relationships shift and change, and this happens in different patterns depending on the starting conditions. Little is known about the categorisation of these patterns, or even the range of relationships possible. The models used to simulate them are still a research topic in their own right, so in this project we are hoping to explore different ways people can both control a simulation (perhaps with an element of visual live programming), and also experience the results in a number of ways – via a sonifications, or game world. The eventual, ambitious aim – is to provide a way for people to feedback their discoveries into the research.

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Hungry birds citizen science at the Paris Natural History Museum

Some photos of Mónica Arias running her “Hungry Birds” butterfly catching experiment at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris.

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The Museum’s internet capability was challenging, so we ran the game server on a Raspberry Pi with an adhoc wifi and provided the data collection ourselves. The project is concerned with analysing pattern recognition and behaviour in predators. We’re using ten different wing patterns (or morphs), and assigning one at random to be the toxic one, and looking at how long it takes people to learn which are edible.

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New camouflage pattern engine

One of the new projects we have at foam kernow is a ambitious new extension of the egglab player driven camouflage evolution game with Laura Kelley and Anna Hughes at Cambridge Uni.

As part of this we are expanding the patterns possible with the HTML5 canvas based pattern synthesiser to include geometric designs. Anna and Laura are interested in how camouflage has evolved to disrupt perception of movement so we need a similar citizen science game system as the eggs, but with different shapes that move at different speeds.

Here are some test mutations of un-evolved random starting genomes:

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This is an example pattern program:

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Hungry birds 2 – the citizen science edition

One of the three citizen science game projects we currently have running at Foam Kernow is a commission for Mónica Arias at the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle in Paris, who works with this research group. She needed to use the Evolving butterflies game we made last year for the Royal Society Summer exhibition to help her research in pattern evolution and recognition in predators, and make it into a citizen science game. This is a standalone game for the moment, but the source is here.

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We had several issues to address with this version. Firstly a lot more butterfly wing patterns were needed – still the heliconius butterfly species but different types. Mónica then needed to record all player actions determining toxic or edible patterns, so we added a database which required a server (the original is an educational game that runs only on the browser, using webgl). She also needed to run the game in an exhibition in the museum where internet access is problematic, so we worked on a system than could run on a Raspberry Pi to provide a self contained wifi network (similar to Mongoose 2000). This allows her to use whatever makes sense for the museum or a specific event – multiple tablets or PC with a touchscreen, all can be connected via wifi to display the game in a normal browser with all the data recorded on the Pi.

The other aspect of this was to provide her with an ‘admin’ page where she can control and tweak the gameplay as well as collect the data for analysis. This is important as once it’s on a Raspberry Pi I can’t change anything or support it as I could in a normal webserver – but changes can still be made on the spot in reaction to how people play. This also makes the game more useful as researchers can add their own butterfly patterns and change how the selection works, and use it for more experiments in the future.

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Some algorithms for Wild Cricket Tales

On the Wild Cricket Tales citizen science game, one of the tricky problems is grading player created data in terms of quality. The idea is to get people to help the research by tagging videos to measure behaviour of the insect beasts – but we need to accept that there will be a lot of ‘noise’ in the data, how can we detect this and filter it away? Also it would be great if we can detect and acknowledge players who are successful at hunting out and spotting interesting things, or people who are searching through lots of videos. As we found making the camouflage citizen science games, you don’t need much to grab people’s attention if the subject matter is interesting (which is very much the case with this project), but a high score table seems to help. We can also have one per cricket or burrow so that players can more easily see their progress – the single egglab high score table got very difficult to feature on after a few thousand players or so.

We have two separate but related problems – acknowledging players and filtering the data, so it probably makes sense if they can be linked. A commonly used method, which we did with egglab too (also for example in Google’s reCAPTCHA which is also crowdsourcing text digitisation as a side effect) is to get compare multiple people’s results on the same video, but then we still need to bootstrap the scoring from something, and make sure we acknowledge people who are watching videos no one has seen yet, as this is also important.

Below is a simple naive scoring system for calculating a score simply by quantity of events found on a video – we want to give points for finding some events, but over some limit we don’t want to reward endless clicking. It’s probably better if the score stops at zero rather than going negative as shown here, as games should never really ‘punish’ people like this!

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Once we have a bit more data we can start to cluster events to detect if people are agreeing. This can give us some indication of the confidence of the data for a whole video, or a section of it – and it can also be used to figure out a likelihood of an individual event being valid using the sum of neighbouring events weighted by distance via a simple drop-off function.

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If we do this for all the player’s events over a single video we can get an indication of how consistent they are with other players. We could also recursively weight this by a player’s historical scores – so ‘trusted’ players could validate new ones – this is probably a bit too far at this point, but it might be an option if we pre-stock some videos with data from the researchers who are trained with what is important to record.

Wild Cricket Tales

We have a brand new citizen science project starting with the wild crickets research group at Exeter University! These researchers are examining how evolution works with insects in their natural environment, rather than in lab conditions. In order to do this they have hundreds of CCTV cameras set up recording the burrows of field crickets, resulting in many hundreds of hours of footage. This footage needs to be watched in order to determine the various events that make up the life story of the insects. Each individual it turns out has quite distinct characteristics, and we thought it would be fun to open up this process and make it into a citizen science project – partly to get some help and speed up the job, but also the vast quantity of material (hundreds of thousands of hours in total) has it’s own appeal – and it would be great to be able to use it for a creative project like this.

Here is an example of the footage, rather sped up – check out the frog and the sudden switch to daylight mode:

This is the first interface sketch – my plan is to focus on the individual insects and visualise the information coming together by displaying their characteristics, along with which players are their ‘biggest fans’, i.e the people who’ve put the most time into tagging them:

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The video tagging interface itself is the focus of the first prototype I’m working on at the moment. I’ve got a database set up for storing relationships between crickets, their movies and events that people create based on a combination of django and popcorn.js. Below is the first attempt, the buttons add new events as the movie plays that get recorded on the database, and displayed on the timeline bar at the bottom. Currently all players can see all the events globally, so that’s one of the first things to figure out how to handle.

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